Skip to main content

Math Games and Challenges with Deb, 11:10-12:10

This group will play games to deepen math understandings and automaticity. We will also take on some challenging puzzles and logic problems. 

10/26: We played Nine-Lines Tic Tac Toe with 7's.

Screen Shot 2016-10-29 at 5.09.52 PM.png
10/19: We learned a bit about negative numbers through X puzzles (here's a worksheet of X puzzles to solve) and owing money, along with a "Battle to Annihilation" metaphor  (like "zero pairs") where the members of the negative team battle one-to-one with the members of the positive team and we decide which team will win (have survivors) and by how much (how many survivors). We then played Above and Below Zero

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.10.59 PM.png

10/12: We played Tic Tac Toe ProductsSquare It, Match My Part, and Dots and Boxes

Screen Shot 2016-10-12 at 2.59.10 PM.png

10/5: We played 9-Lines Tic Tac Toe, and I introduced the Nine Colors task.

Lunchtime Read Aloud:

Artemis Fowl

Screen Shot 2016-10-05 at 7.11.28 PM.png

Twelve-year-old Artemis Fowl is a millionaire, a genius—and, above all, a criminal mastermind. But even Artemis doesn't know what he's taken on when he kidnaps a fairy, Captain Holly Short of the LEPrecon Unit. These aren't the fairies of bedtime stories—they're dangerous! Full of unexpected twists and turns, Artemis Fowl is a riveting, magical adventure.

Etymology of WEDNESDAY


Middle English 

wodnesdaywednesday, or wednesdai

Old English 

wodnesdæg "Woden's day"

Woden is the chief Anglo-Saxon/Teutonic god. Woden is the leader of the Wild Hunt.

Woden is from wod "violently insane" + -en "headship"

Woden is the HEAD of the VIOLENTLY INSANE.

Just saying! ;p

Latin 

dies Mercurii "day of Mercury"

Mercury is the Roman god of commerce, travel, theivery, eloquence and science. He is the messenger of the other gods.

Ancient Greek 

hemera Hermu "day of Hermes"

Hermes is the Greek god of commerce, invention, cunning, and theft. He is the messenger and herald of the other gods. He serves as patron of travelers and rogues, and as the conductor of the dead to Hades.

GROUPERS 2016-2017

Screenshot 2015-08-17 at 9.37.09 PM.png
 

Second Semester Focus Group:

Persuasion in Fictional and Nonfictional Political and Dystopian Writing


This class will examine how writers make their case in both fiction and nonfiction, with an emphasis on rights, protest, government, politics, and law.

We will explore how writers make their case, support their arguments, and persuade their readers. We will write to persuade while emulating the style, voice, and genre of authors we read. We will learn how to construct a persuasive essay and a response essay using textual citations, data, quotations, and references.


Week 8: We discussed the Children of the Dust quote, thesis statement question and fiction challenge. We played Wise and Otherwise. Here’s Lilly’s Chickens Part 5.


Week 7: We fiddled with writing essays using a randomly selected BECAUSE (because it would be easier to juggle). Here’s Lilly’s Chickens Part 4.

 

Week 6: We discussed our ideas after Lilly’s Chicken’s Part 2 and the homework is to look at Lilly’s Chickens Part 3 and answer the questions..  Consider the SCORER mnemonic (Stories, Counter-Argument, Opinion, Reasons, Evidence, Recommendation) and begin to consider the elements Kingsolver is using. The questions are homework.

 

Week 5: We discussed our ideas after Lilly’s Chicken’s Part 1 and looked at Lilly’s Chickens Part 2.  We looked at the SCORER mnemonic and began to consider the elements Kingsolver is using. The questions are homework.

 

We POSTPONED looking at excerpts from Animal Farm. We will come back to it later in the class and craft some thesis statements connecting this modern essay (Lilly’s Chickens) and this allegorical novella (Animal Farm) from 1945.

 

Week 4: We watched a clip from Captain Fantastic We developed thesis statements about that scene. We listened to/read Lilly’s Chickens Part 1 and explore our thinking so far about Kingsolver’s thesis. This is homework.

 

Week 3: We continued to work on the superfight essays and shared them in class.

 

Week 2: We looked over the Lorax packet and decided to leave it for now. We introduced and set up our first Superfight:

 

SUPERFIGHT THESIS STATEMENTS:

  • Our identical twins will defeat your mad scientist (who can take the form of anything water-based and shoots acid) because we are identical twins, we are armed with lightsabers, and most importantly because we are wearing rocket-powered roller skates.
  • Our identical twins will defeat your werewolf (armed with Cupid’s bow and able to walk through solid objects) because we are identical twins, we are armed with lightsabers, and most importantly because we are wearing rocket-powered roller skates.
  • Our mad scientist will defeat your identical twins (who are armed with lightsabers, and wearing rocket-powered roller skates) because he is a mad scientist, he can take the form of anything water-based and, most importantly, because he shoots acid.
  • Our mad scientist will defeat your werewolf (armed with Cupid’s bow and able to walk through solid objects) because he is a mad scientist, he can take the form of anything water-based and, most importantly, because he shoots acid.
  • Our werewolf will defeat your identical twins (who are armed with lightsabers, and wearing rocket-powered roller skates) because she is a werewolf, she is armed with Cupid’s bow and, most importantly, because she is able to walk through solid objects.
  • Our werewolf will defeat your mad scientist (who can take the form of anything water-based and shoots acid) because she is a werewolf, she is armed with Cupid’s bow and, most importantly, because she is able to walk through solid objects.

To develop your arguments, you can do research on any of these topics, or you can make things up. Use logic and precise, convincing language. The typical rudimentary structure for an essay is:

  1. Introduction that ends with thesis statement (assertion plus three reasons)
  2. Body Paragraph 1: Assertion plus reason one, with three pieces of evidence (data, quote, example from life/story)
  3. Body Paragraph 2: Assertion plus reason two, with three pieces of evidence (data, quote, example from life/story)
  4. Body Paragraph 3: Assertion plus reason three, with three pieces of evidence (data, quote, example from life/story)
  5. Conclusion that reiterates the thesis statement and often makes a recommendation

Week 1: Thesis statement = assertion + reasons

Argument Matching

Introduce The Lorax Response Packet

Homework: complete pp. 4-5 of the Lorax Response Packet. We will do 6-10 in class next week.

 

First Semester Focus Group:

Problem-Solving Workshop with Deb

9:35—10:35

In this group, we will do some mental math and discuss together how we thought about or solved the problem. We will also work on some kind of challenging, layered problem or mathematical investigation in small teams or individually with group processing about what we discovered. When I get it right, the students will keep puzzling during the week between classes!

 

Problem-Solving Workshop

with Deb 9:35—10:35

In this group, we will do some mental math and discuss together how we thought about or solved the problem. We will also work on some kind of challenging, layered problem or mathematical investigation in small teams or individually with group processing about what we discovered. When I get it right, the students will keep puzzling during the week between classes!

 

11/30: Today we talked about how to make our triangular number investigation into something to share at the math festival in January. We will work on that next week. We also took a look at a Game Theory and Probability Problem (see below). We made art representations of triangular numbers and other patterns.


We also played an initial round of the crazy card game POUNCE. We will play pounce again next week after we work on the presentation for the Math Night. 







 

11/16: Today we returned to our triangular number problems, including the stair step problem, the bowling pin problem, and the pyramid of oranges problem. After that we played Sequence.

 The object is to get a "sequence," meaning a row of five poker-like chips on the game board. The board itself depicts lines of face-up playing cards. Players place their "crowning" chips on top of the card pictures, and can form sequences by using strategy and knowing which Sequence cards to keep or discard. Forethought, luck, and backup plans are the keys to winning this game.


 

11/9: Today we played Rummikub, searching for patterns and ways to rearrange them to be the first to rid ourselves of tiles.


This game reinforces Stem and Steam concepts such as sequencing, pattern recognition, and planning skills.

11/2: Today we began with this problem:

Leo the Rabbit is climbing up a flight of 10 steps. Leo can only hop up 1 or 2 steps each time he hops. He never hops down, only up.

How many different ways can Leo hop up the flight of 10 steps? Provide evidence to justify your thinking.

Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.45.55 AM.pngScreen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.46.34 AM.png


Looking at actual rabbits on actual steps, is this a reasonable problem? Can they go up two steps at a time? 

We continued on to with a POM (Problem of the Month) that is related to our stair step problem.

Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.49.30 AM.png



Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.51.18 AM.png




Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.52.06 AM.png


Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.52.17 AM.png
Screen Shot 2016-11-02 at 11.52.27 AM.png

 

10/26: Today we looked at arrays with units, Base Ten blocks, and Algebra Tiles:


Screen Shot 2016-10-27 at 12.12.59 PM.png
Screen Shot 2016-10-27 at 12.10.18 PM.png
Screen Shot 2016-10-27 at 12.14.10 PM.png

We then looked again at our repeating pattern of squares. Our goal was to show the growth, to record it on a function table, to graph it, and to derive an algebraic equation that would let us calculate the total number of tiles in any iteration.

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.49.17 PM.png

We looked at the function table and the differences of the y value, and then the second difference, and began to ponder how we can SEE when a table will correlate with at linear equation and when it will correlate with a quadratic equation. We also saw that the pattern is the iteration before plus the number of the new iteration (added to the bottom). If we take Figure 2 and add three underneath it, we get Figure 3. If we then take Figure 3 and add four underneath it, we get Figure 4. And so on.

 

 

Difference of the Difference
x (figure #) y (total tiles) difference from row to row difference of difference from row to row
1 1 3-1 =   2 3-2 = 1
2 3 6-3 =   3 4-3 = 1
3 6 10-6 =  4 5-4 = 1
4 10 15-10 = 5 ?-5 = 1
5 15 ?  

 

This lead to some amazing thinking, lots of pondering, attempts to understand and to share that understanding, an alternate version of pattern growth, and some entirely unrelated artwork.

 


 

10/19: Today we looked at X puzzles (here's a worksheet of X puzzles to solve) to derive the mathematical relationship of the numbers through pattern and mathematical language or expressions. 

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.40.33 PM.pngScreen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.40.05 PM.png

We then looked at a repeating pattern of squares. Our goal was to show the growth, to record it on a function table, to graph it, and to derive an algebraic equation that would let us calculate the total number of tiles in any iteration.

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.49.17 PM.png
 

This lead to some amazing thinking, lots of pondering, attempts to understand and to share that understanding, an alternate version of pattern growth, and some entirely unrelated artwork:

 

Screen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.39.35 PM.pngScreen Shot 2016-10-19 at 4.39.12 PM.png

10/12: Today we played Square It! and solved a simple puzzle called Square Corners. Then we worked on the How Old Am I problem (here is a place to look at the thinking of others for this problem)

 

Screen Shot 2016-10-12 at 10.45.49 AM.png


 

10/5: We looked at a three-step word problem together—about roofing nails—to solve in our heads as a warm up. We shared solutions. Next, we worked on the Nine Colors task, where the goal is to build a cube with each of the nine colors on each of the six faces. 


Screen Shot 2016-10-05 at 2.32.46 PM.png